Motherhood: How To Potty Train Your Child

For every first time mum, the idea of transitioning your toddler from nappy to a potty can be daunting. According to parenting.com, there are a lot of ways to approach potty training and there are specified methods for each boy and girl.

TRAINING IN SESSIONS 
In the book Potty Training Boys the Easy Way: Helping Your Son Learn Quickly – Even if He’s a Late Starter by Caroline Fertleman and Simon Cove suggests starting off with potty training sessions. This means that you’ll want to train your child in the morning and afternoon for a few hours at home. Let him eat, drink and play as normal, but every 15 minutes put him on the potty. At the end of a session, revert back to a diaper or pull-up and go on with your day. When you get home, have another session. On the third day, go for an all-day session. If you leave the house, have a spare potty in the car or visit places you’re sure have public restrooms.

NAKED TIME
Let your child walk around your home
…naked, or in just a T-shirt. Because he’s not wearing a diaper or underwear, he’ll have no place to put his pee or poop; he needs to put it somewhere—in the toilet would be a good idea! When he does put it in the potty, make sure you both have a look (yuck, I know, but the visual is important.) Make flushing a huge deal by pointing at the swirling water and acknowledging the cool whooshing sound.

GIVE REWARDS

Stickers, stamps on the hand, bubbles or a single M&M are all good potty prizes. Kick it up a notch by taking your child to the dollar store so he can pick out a super-special potty prize for a training milestone like the first full day in undies or staying dry overnight. Food prizes like a pizza party for dinner or ice cream sundae bar for dessert (set out sprinkles, gummy bears and cherries in bowls, and let your child create his own sundae) are also great ideas. If you don’t want to spend money, look around your house for an art project you can do together and display it so he can show off his “potty prize.”

BE PROACTIVE AT SCHOOL

Be sure to alert your child’s teacher to the fact that you are actively potty training at home. Teachers are busy with lots of kids, not just yours, so if your child needs a reminder to go, be sure to share this with the teacher. Make going potty at school less scary by exploring the facilities with your child. Try drop-off a little earlier so you can accompany your child into the bathroom and watch as he does his business. If you reward with stickers at home, bring some in for the teacher—she’ll gladly give them out to your potty pro.